TU Berlin

Neural Information ProcessingNeural Information Processing

Neuronale Informationsverarbeitung

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Neural Information Processing Group

We are concerned with the principles underlying information processing in biological systems. On the one hand we want to understand how the brain computes, on the other hand we want to utilize the strategies employed by biological systems for machine learning applications. Our research interests cover three thematic areas.

Models of Neuronal Systems:

Lupe

In collaboration with neurobiologists and clinicians we study how the visual system processes visual information. Research topics include: cortical dynamics, the representation of visual information, adaptation and plasticity, and the role of feedback. More recently we became interested in how perception is linked to cognitive function, and we began to study computational models of decision making in uncertain environments, and how those processes interact with perception and memory.

Machine Learning and Neural Networks:

Lupe

Here we investigate how machines can learn from examples in order to predict and (more recently) act. Research topics include the learning of proper representations, active and semisupervised learning schemes, and prototype-based methods. Motivated by the model-based analysis of decision making in humans we also became interested in reinforcement learning schemes and how these methods can be extended to cope with multi-objective cost functions. In collaboration with colleagues from the application domains, machine learning methods are applied to different problems ranging from computer vision, information retrieval, to chemoinformatics.

Analysis of Neural Data:

Lupe

Here we are interested to apply machine learning and statistical methods to the analysis of multivariate biomedical data, in particular to data which form the basis of our computational studies of neural systems. Research topics vary and currently include spike-sorting and the analysis of multi-tetrode recordings, confocal microscopy and 3D-reconstruction techniques, and the analysis of imaging data. Recently we became interested in the analysis of multimodal data, for example, correlating anatomical, imaging, and genetic data.

Selected Publications

NAPC: A Neural Algorithm for Automated Passenger Counting in Public Transport on a Privacy-Friendly Dataset
Citation key Seidel2022
Author Seidel, R. and Jahn, N. and Seo, S. and Goerttler, T. and Obermayer, K.
Pages 33-44
Year 2022
DOI 10.1109/OJITS.2021.3139393
Journal IEEE Open Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems
Volume 3
Abstract Real-time load information in public transport is of high importance for both passengers and service providers. Neural algorithms have shown a high performance on various object counting tasks and play a continually growing methodological role in developing automated passenger counting systems. However, the publication of public-space video footage is often contradicted by legal and ethical considerations to protect the passengers’ privacy. This work proposes an end-to-end Long Short-Term Memory network with a problem-adapted cost function that learned to count boarding and alighting passengers on a publicly available, comprehensive dataset of approx.13,000 manually annotated low-resolution 3D LiDAR video recordings (depth information only) from the doorways of a regional train. These depth recordings do not allow the identification of single individuals. For each door opening phase, the trained models predict the correct passenger count (ranging from 0 to 67) in approx.96% of boarding and alighting, respectively. Repeated training with different training and validation sets confirms the independence of this result from a specific test set.
Bibtex Type of Publication Selected:structured selected:publications selected:main
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